Lynn
Herndon

“With experience comes the ability to predict a case’s outcome, and that is something clients tend to value.”

Litigating issues “about a thousand feet deep” for nearly a decade, Lynn Herndon has focused her practice on intellectual property law. She has represented sophisticated Fortune 500 companies in patent disputes related to software, computer science, medical software, medical device, video game, and body camera technologies.

 

Because of its ever-changing nature, the practice intrigues her. “Since I started practicing, the U.S. Supreme Court has frequently taken up cases involving or affecting patent law,” she says. “Forecasting what the law might be in the future and counseling our clients on how it might affect litigation is a very important part of my practice.”

 

Lynn continues her IP focus at Nyemaster and has expanded her practice to include broader commercial litigation. “What I’ve always liked about commercial litigation is that you usually have sophisticated parties on both sides putting forth their best effort to drill down to the real issues and how they can be resolved,” she says.

 

That collaboration is the cornerstone of her practice. “I really value collaboration and being able to share ideas amongst a team,” Lynn says. “I’ve always felt bringing the smartest and most amiable people together to collaborate on a problem has always resulted in a net for the client.”

 

Prior to law school, Lynn worked for the investment division of a large, regional bank handling public finance transactions. This introduced Lynn to a career in the law. Routinely working with attorneys, Lynn quickly picked up on the importance of their roles. “A career in law was something I never considered until I observed it firsthand and realized this was something completely in my wheelhouse.”

 

She’s never looked back, leveraging both opportunities and her creativity. “There is no treatise on how to be a good lawyer. It comes with practice. It comes with being presented with new problems every single day that you have never had to solve before.”

 

Missouri and Kansas Super Lawyers Rising Star

 

UMKC Law Review
Editor-in-Chief

 

The Urban Lawyer
Student Staff Member 

 

Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE)
National and World Champion, Drury University Team Member, 2003

 

American Bar Association 
Intellectual Property Law Section

“Help You, Help Me: Why Law Students Need Peer Teaching,” 78 UMKC L. Rev. 809, 2010

 

“Case Note, Huff v. Dekalb County,” The Urban Lawyer, Winter 2009

 

OVERVIEW

Litigating issues “about a thousand feet deep” for nearly a decade, Lynn Herndon has focused her practice on intellectual property law. She has represented sophisticated Fortune 500 companies in patent disputes related to software, computer science, medical software, medical device, video game, and body camera technologies.

 

Because of its ever-changing nature, the practice intrigues her. “Since I started practicing, the U.S. Supreme Court has frequently taken up cases involving or affecting patent law,” she says. “Forecasting what the law might be in the future and counseling our clients on how it might affect litigation is a very important part of my practice.”

 

Lynn continues her IP focus at Nyemaster and has expanded her practice to include broader commercial litigation. “What I’ve always liked about commercial litigation is that you usually have sophisticated parties on both sides putting forth their best effort to drill down to the real issues and how they can be resolved,” she says.

 

That collaboration is the cornerstone of her practice. “I really value collaboration and being able to share ideas amongst a team,” Lynn says. “I’ve always felt bringing the smartest and most amiable people together to collaborate on a problem has always resulted in a net for the client.”

 

Prior to law school, Lynn worked for the investment division of a large, regional bank handling public finance transactions. This introduced Lynn to a career in the law. Routinely working with attorneys, Lynn quickly picked up on the importance of their roles. “A career in law was something I never considered until I observed it firsthand and realized this was something completely in my wheelhouse.”

 

She’s never looked back, leveraging both opportunities and her creativity. “There is no treatise on how to be a good lawyer. It comes with practice. It comes with being presented with new problems every single day that you have never had to solve before.”

 

RECOGNITION

Missouri and Kansas Super Lawyers Rising Star

 

UMKC Law Review
Editor-in-Chief

 

The Urban Lawyer
Student Staff Member 

 

Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE)
National and World Champion, Drury University Team Member, 2003

 

PROFESSIONAL & COMMUNITY AFFILIATIONS

American Bar Association 
Intellectual Property Law Section

SPEECHES & PUBLICATIONS

“Help You, Help Me: Why Law Students Need Peer Teaching,” 78 UMKC L. Rev. 809, 2010

 

“Case Note, Huff v. Dekalb County,” The Urban Lawyer, Winter 2009